Staffing Advisors Blog

Is your Job Different than you Expected? Change How You Interview.

Posted by Mitch Corlett on July 2, 2013

A recent Glassdoor survey found what you probably already know...often the reality of a job differs from what you expected. If you've been burned before, here are a few ways that you can do a better job of knowing what you are getting into:

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Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

Posted by Bob Corlett on July 1, 2013

I have never been comfortable answering the standard interview question, "Where do you see yourself in 5 years?" because I never planned my career in that way. Many people feel the same way. It's not that we don't have goals, but our goals are not oriented toward picking a spot for ourselves on the organization chart. Perhaps 30 years ago people in stable organizations could plan careers that way,  "I see myself as Director of ____ in 3 years," or "I plan to be Vice President of ____ in 5 years."

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Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

Posted by Bob Corlett on July 1, 2013

 

I have never been comfortable answering the standard interview question, "Where do you see yourself in 5 years?" because I never planned my career in that way. Many people feel the same way. It's not that we don't have goals, but our goals are not oriented toward picking a spot for ourselves on the organization chart. Perhaps 30 years ago people in stable organizations could plan careers that way,  "I see myself as Director of ____ in 3 years," or "I plan to be Vice President of ____ in 5 years." But those days are long gone.

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How to be believable during job interviews

Posted by Bob Corlett on June 24, 2013

One of the least understood aspects of job interviewing is this — most interviewers will not trust your opinion of yourself, they will only trust the conclusions they form about you on their own. Your job is to help them form the right conclusions by how you answer their questions.

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How to Answer Interview Questions (Believably)

Posted by Bob Corlett on June 19, 2013

One of the least understood aspects of interviewing is this; most interviewers will not trust your opinion of yourself, they will only trust the conclusions they form about you on their own. So your job is to help them form the right conclusions by how you answer their questions.

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Are you perfect for the job? Don't be so sure about that

Posted by Bob Corlett on June 17, 2013

When looking for a new job, most openings might not sound very appealing. Occasionally you hear about a job and think to yourself, "I am perfect for this job. It’s tailor-made for me." Excitedly, you dash off your cover letter and apply right away because you know your resume is ideal for the job.

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How To Interview An Innovator

Posted by Bob Corlett on February 19, 2013

Clients often engage us to help them find an innovator for a strategically significant project. They need people who have taken something entirely new and gotten it off the ground, which is all too rare.

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Do you speak the language of the CEO? 

Posted by Bob Corlett on February 4, 2013

My client called me right after he interviewed two people. "I just don’t see Mike being very effective with our CEO. He just doesn't have the chops for it." Then his tone brightened, "But Susan would be perfect. She’d fit right in with our executive team. They’d hit it off right away." So Susan was scheduled to meet the CEO, and Mike’s interview process was over.

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Questions Great Candidates Ask in Interviews

Posted by Bob Corlett on January 3, 2013

Be honest. Do you feel that the part of the job interview where you ask the candidate, "Do you have any questions for me" is almost always a waste of time?  Chances are good your answer is “yes.”

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How to Speak for your Work

Posted by Brooke Lockhart on November 6, 2012

Lot of us grew up believing that if you just do good work, the work will speak for itself. That’s one of those beliefs that is true only if your supervisors are paying attention. When there is a lot going on, management probably won’t notice good work unless you speak for it. The further up you go in any organization, the work stops speaking for itself. You have to speak for the work.  So, what’s an effective approach to speaking for the work?, asks executive coach and author Scott Eblin.  He offers five road-tested steps that most senior execs appreciate:

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