Is your Job Different than you Expected? Change How You Interview.

Posted by Mitch Corlett on July 2, 2013

A recent Glassdoor survey found what you probably already know...often the reality of a job differs from what you expected. If you've been burned before, here are a few ways that you can do a better job of knowing what you are getting into:

Do Your Company Research Before the Interview:  Hiring managers get frustrated by candidates who don’t know the company, its mission, products, history, competitors, strategic goals or big news stories. Avoid it by doing proper research - three hours at least, not the one hour or less you might be attempting right now. If you don’t know where to begin, our post has five ways to get you started. If possible, you should also try to research your boss ahead of time. (See this post for more on how.)

Ask More Questions During the Interview: Consider that Glassdoor found 39% of candidates were unclear about the job responsibilities for their new position. If you’re one of those people, often you could have avoided the disaster if you had asked more and better questions during the interview.  Not only will you be more clear on the specifics of the position you’re applying for, but asking smart questions is also one of the best ways to impress the hiring manager. And no, it's not a breach of etiquette. Our post has plenty of suggestions to get you started. (Also check out our related post, Smart Questions to Ask in an Interview)

20 Things to be Cautious of While Interviewing: We would all like to assume that the person you are interviewing with is completely honest and telling you everything you need to know. But sometimes this isn't always the case, or the person you’re speaking with just isn't as knowledgeable as you would like. Our post has a few of our favorite "red flags" to watch out for while interviewing.

When the New Job Doesn’t Work Out: Sometimes, even if you were well prepared, the position just isn't what you expected. How do you decide if it is time to quit and cut your losses, or if it's time to stand and deliver despite the obstacles? Check out Bob’s article in the Washington Business Journal with a few questions to ask yourself before you cut and run.

More of a visual person? Check out our YouTube video with a few tips on how to prepare for your next interview.

Topics: Career Advice, Getting Started, Job interview, Recruiting On Your Own